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Heated Towel Rails Frequently Asked Questions

Our Product FAQ section deals with questions about our products, installation types, rules and regulations, guidance and facts If you still have not found an answer to your query, please contact us either by phone or e-mail so that a member of our team can offer assistance.
 
Product FAQ - Technical Information & Installation Related Questions
 

Towel radiators are a certain type of radiators that were originally designed to dry towels in bathrooms and kitchens. However in the past decade they have become a standard item in every bathroom in the UK. Furthermore, with the increase in the production of larger sizes, towel radiators are increasingly installed in dining and sitting rooms too due to their elegant and versatile looks.

Towel radiators can be manufactured from steel, stainless steel, aluminium and brass. They can be painted, plated in chrome, or just polished for brushed affect finish (stainless steel radiators only).

Yes, it is possible to replace your conventional radiator with a towel radiator as they both work in the same way. Hot water enters the radiator from one side, travels through it and exits from the other side. The heat output and the distance between pipe centres of both radiators must be considered when replacing your existing radiator with a towel radiator.

The distance between the centre points of the two pipes that, which are part of the central heating, will connect the radiator to the central heating system via two valves. Pipe centres information is needed when installing the pipes.

Yes, it is possible to do so. However, please note that most conventional radiators would have their inlet points on the sides whereas ladder type towel radiators have their inlet points at the bottom of the two vertical bars facing the floor. Therefore, if your existing radiator is 600mm wide, you will find that the distance between the two pipes (pipe-centre) is greater than the width of your radiator, perhaps around 630-660mm, while a 600mm wide towel radiator would have its pipe centres as 550mm. Therefore please take this information into consideration when deciding on the width of your next towel radiator, as any changes in the pipe centres will require adjustment to the pipes.

BTU is the abbreviation for British Thermal Unit, which is the British standard unit of energy. BTU as a heating measure is used to determine heat requirements of bathrooms, kitchens and other parts of houses. Technically, one BTU is equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of liquid water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at its maximum density, which occurs at a temperature of 39.1 degrees Fahrenheit. One BTU is equal to approximately 251.9 calories or 1055 joules.

You can use our BTU Calculator to determine the BTU amount required for your bathroom before you select the size of the radiator.

There are three ways to use a towel radiator. They;

1) run off the Central Heating System,
2) are used with a heating element without any connection to the central heating, or
3) are used as duel fuel meaning that they are both connected to the central heating and have an electric element inserted into them, which could be used in summer when the central heating is off.

Further technical information about these installation methods can be found on our Pictures & Drawings of Possible Towel Radiator Connections page.

You will need the following parts for this option;
- Towel Radiator
- A Pair of Valves

Towel radiators are fitted by using brackets and valves. The four brackets supplied are used to fix the radiator onto the wall. The two entry points at the bottom of the two vertical bars of the radiator are used to connect the radiator to the pipe work. The third entry point on the top is inserted with a small nut called “Air Vent/Bleed Valve” that is used to let trapped air out of the radiator. Brackets and bleed valves are supplied as standard with all ladder type towel radiators for free of charge.

The type of valves you need depends on the location of the pipes. If they are coming out of the floor you will need a pair of straight valves. If, however, they are coming out of the wall you will need a pair of angled valves.

If the radiator is to be a dual-fuel one, you will then need a pair of angled valves along with two Tee pipes and a blanking plug, which are listed in the Accessories section in the Products Menu. Conventionally, chrome valves are used with chrome radiators while white valves are used with white painted radiators.

You will need the following parts for this option;
- Towel Radiator
- Electric Element
- One Blanking Plug
For More Information, Please refer to our illustrations page.

The choice of electric element depends on the size of the radiator and/or the type of use required from the radiator. The heat output figures in Watts may be referred to choose the right electric element for the right size radiator. If only summer use is required, the electric element with the smallest heat output can be chosen.

Electric only towel radiators are also wall mounted but are not connected to the central heating system. An electric element is inserted into the radiator through one of the entry points at the bottom. The second entry point on the other side is then sealed off by a blanking plug. The radiator is then filled with tap water using the third entry point on the top of the radiator. Please remember not to fill the radiator to full but leave a gap as big as two inches on the top for heated water to expand and move freely inside the radiator. Once the radiator is filled with water, use the air-vent/bleed valve to seal the third entry point and get a trained electrician to complete wiring. More information can be found on our Electric Element Installation Guide - Electric Only & Dual Fuel.

A dual use towel radiator is the one that is powered by an electric element but also is connected to the central heating system. The benefit of having a dual fuel radiator is to be able to use it in summer when the central heating system is turned off.

You will need the following parts for this option;

- Towel Radiator
- Electric Element
- Two Tee pipes
- One Blanking Plug
- A pair of angled valves (regardless of where the pipes are located)

For More Information, Please refer to our illustrations page.

Two Tee pipes are fitted into the two entry points at the bottom. The side entries on the Tee pipes are connected to the valves. Of the bottom entries of the two Tee pipes, one is blanked off with a blanking plug and the other is used for the electric element to be inserted into the radiator. The valves are then connected to the pipes of the central heating system.

For More Information, Please refer to our illustrations page.

*WARNING* All electric elements must be installed and wired by a trained and certified electrician.
*WARNING* All electric towel radiators must be filled with water.
*WARNING* All electric elements must be fully submerged in water.
*WARNING* Electric only or duel fuel radiators can only be installed in Zone 3 or beyond.

(Please note that this information is given for guidance only and that You MUST consult a trained and certified electrician for your own safety.)

Due to the risks involved in using electrical equipments in bathrooms, the IEE Wiring Regulations are put in place that creates zones within the bathroom to indicate what type of electrical equipment be used and installed wherein. All our electric heating elements are CE certified and have clear marks on them stating where they can be installed.

Tip!: Green area on the image below is safe to install an electric or duel use towel radiator.

Zone 0 The interior of the bath or shower which can hold water.
Zone 1 The area directly above Zone 0, which is vertically limited to 2.25m above the bottom of the bath.
Zone 2 The area beyond Zones 0 and 1. It is 0.6m horizontally and up to 2.25m vertically. Zone 2 also includes any windows with a sill next to the bath.
Zone 3 The area beyond zones 2. It is 2.4m horizontally and up to 2.25m vertically.

On the tip of each element are a safety thermal fuse and a built-in thermostat. Once the water temperature inside the radiator reaches 82 Celsius/180F, this thermostat kicks in to cut of power. When the water temperature inside the radiator goes down below 75 Celsius/167F, it simply comes back on again.

All towel radiators are supplied with 4 adjustable brackets enabling you to adjust the distance between the wall and the centre of the radiator (centre of the horizontal bars) to a value between 75mm and 105mm. The actual projection from the wall to the front of the radiator is minimum 90mm and maximum 120mm.

Please note that these figures only apply to FLAT radiators. You will need to add an additional 30mm to 60mm to CURVED radiators. i.e., 400mm wide curved radiator will protrude approximately 30mm further than flat models.